About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
MSNBCW 26
CSPAN 17
CNNW 12
CSPAN2 6
MSNBC 6
KNTV (NBC) 5
FBC 4
KGO (ABC) 4
CNN 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
WETA 3
CNBC 2
KQED (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 124
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)
nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment begins "congress shall enact no law." so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions by different states on religion? >> guest: oh, yes, there were. several states had religious establishments. most states limited the amount of property a religious organization could own. some taxed religious property. others banned given groups' practices. i'm thinking, for example, eventually various states in the southwest banning polygamy, for example. >> host: so when it came to massachusetts, talk abou
. it'll continue for about 90 minutes. there'll be a panel on improving government performance. we'll have it live for you here on c-span2. yesterday and today johns hopkins university in baltimore has been hosting a summit on reducing gun violence. speakers have included new york city mayor michael bloomberg and maryland governor martin o'malley. this afternoon at 4 eastern they will hold a news conference to release their recommendations for stemming gun violence. we'll have live coverage here on c-span2. again, that will be at 4 p.m. eastern. >>> and right around this time to have year every year governors address their state legislatures on the state of their states. laying out the priorities for the new year. tonight at 7:30 we'll take you live to the kansas statehouse for an address by the state's governor, sam brownback. that'll get underway at 7:30 eastern. >> he had been talking about this dream that he had had. he had talked about it for years, you know? the american dream. and that had become his dream. and he had been in detroit just a few months before, and he had talk
, i think the government could have difficulty defending a law the highest court to consider the assault weapons ban was the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit and it recently upheld a ban in d.c. the court assumed the weapons were in common use but the ban imposed no real burden on the people's ability to a firearm for self-defense. similarly, it applies to a restriction on high-capacity magazines, which we treat separately than an assault weapons ban. what a ban on the sale of high- capacity magazines, capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition be unconstitutional? i think it is a similar analysis. common use? , used for self-defense? it upheld the restriction on the sale of high-capacity magazines as well. yes, they are probably in common use. yes, there are millions and millions of these high-capacity magazines out there -- however, the court says self-defense typically does not require more than 10 rounds of ammunition. and there remains issues of fit, whether it substantially ferber's -- recent data suggest that the 1994 ban did have an impact, that th
that the government is free to regulate the kinds of weapons that people carry. it says that. >> if your therapist thinks you could be a threat to someone, could he or she be required to turn you in? in new york state, yes. >> it is not that he needed a great computer system to figure out a solution, it was common sense. mentally ill people should not have access to guns. criminals should not have access to guns. >> common sense, but we will see how easy it is to enforce. andrew cuomo signed the toughest law in the nation dealing with guns. the purpose was to keep the guns out of the hands of the mentally ill. the shooters at virginia tech and colorado have both received little help counseling. under the new law, the top professionals believe it is unethical to use it and illegally have to be reported to limit of director and that person in turn has to go to the state criminal justice establishment which could then go after the fire arms. critics say this all 5 the doctor-patient relationship, at least in the mental-health field. we have a board to a defense psychiatrist. what do you think of this
obligations. you can't do that. and that's not a credible way to run this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of am
and government reform committee. host: good morning. house members have returned to washington with votes slated later today for emergency aid for victims of superstorm sandy. new york is poised to become the first state to act in response to the mass shooting in newtown, connecticut, keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill and banning assault weapons. president obama has in hand to the recommendations from joe biden on gun-control and will push for action. the front page of the washington journal says president obama escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for
enforcement. keeping data on where the guns are. the government stopped keeping those records in 2004 and improving the background check system. so there's more sharing of information. joe, the other path forward would be congressional action and we're told that the president will push for an assault weapons ban and expansion of the gun sales of all kinds. even if i tried to sell you a gun privately, that would require a background check and then limit the sale of high-capacity magazines. those are some of the major issues. we expect to hear the president outline tomorrow, joe. >> jess, is this the kitchen sink or are there things they held back on? >> reporter: well, what the president is describing it as is comprehensive and these are issues that they prioritize. i expect that the white house is is going to place a serious emphasis on this high-capacity magazine issue. i'm told that in private meeting the vice president has emphasized that the high capacity magazine could make as much of a difference, more of a difference, maybe, than any other pressure. he has pointed out to multip
to have their allies leave, their government is weak and that there's a chance they will slide back into not just taliban control but potentially civil war. >> suarez: on tonight's daily download, we look back at the 2012 election and ahead to the inauguration with the obama campaign's internet guru, harper reed. >> we basically built what amounted to an ad-tech company, but instead of targeting ads on the internet, of course we did that, we really maximized the targeting that's physical. what that means is we're not wasting anyone's time. >> brown: and we examine the fallout from tour de france champion lance armstrong's admission that he used performance enhancing drugs. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contribionso yo pbs statn from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama called today for what amount
of government. a set of principles emerged that there is not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit and another 10 to 12 minutes, i want to lay out what they are from the perspective of the president. the first foundational principle is there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment that comes with the right of law-abiding responsible citizen to own guns, gives a further protection as well as recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not and legally can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners comprise. three, we should make common sense judgment about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government at the same time recognizing, honoring them being compliant with the second amendment. and for, this isn't just about guns. it is about the coursing of our culture. the coursing of our cult
with heavy guns, and with hostages. it was a bloody scene. the algerian government says that 11 militants were killed, apparently the last militants there, but also, the seven foreign hostages were killed. now, the reuters news agency quoting a security source says that 16 foreign hostages were freed today and included in that number, two americans. but as we've noted it's not yet confirmed by washington, and or for that matter, picked up by other media agencies. one american has died in this four-day long saga, the texan who died of a heart attack, at least five others were free. all told, throughout this whole thing, dozens of foreign hostages have died and as well as dozens of hostages. secretary of defense leon panetta was in london today and he had some very strong words for those responsible for this attack. >> cannot accept attacks against our citizens and our interests abroad. neither can we accept an al-qaeda safe haven anywhere in the world. . >> reporter: and panetta was asked about the algerian forces tactics throughout this and criticized by various countries, a bit heavy-ha
of the individual and the power of the state. at the time that you're talking about in 1787, the government had muskets and individuals had muskets, there was a very close correlation between the power to use violence on both sides. the other thing that you have to take into account, this is something i haven't heard in this debate, and that is if you look basically to the middle of the 19th century, 1862, the winchester henry rifle, report on that rifle that i just cited in a recent paper showed that it fired 15 rounds in less than ten seconds. the fact of the matter is that repeating technology is 150 years old. and one of the worries here, i think, for people who are on the other side of this is that when we go through this bad gun analysis that there's not really a solid boundary between the current category of assault weapons, parcularly rifles, and any other gun that is out there. >> why ban machine guns then? >> machine guns were banned in 1934 as a result of the national firearms act. >> why not ban the ar-15? >> i think you can make a coherent distinks between semi-automatic firing and
22 people died. the opposition said it was 24-- most of them, government troops. the attacks came a day after two large explosions killed 87 people at the main university in aleppo. classes were suspended today. iraq witnessed its own string of bombings that killed at least 33 people. the city of kirkuk suffered the worst attack when a car bomber blew himself up outside the offices of a major kurdish party. 21 people were killed in that bombing and another nearby, and nearly 200 were wounded. a u.s. marine pleaded guilty today to urinating on the remains of dead taliban fighters in afghanistan. staff sergeant edward deptola submitted his plea at camp lejeune, north carolina. images of the incident surfaced last year, sparking an international furor and outrage in afghanistan. another marine pleaded guilty to similar charges last month. three others were given administrative punishment. the two biggest airlines in japan grounded all of their brand new boeing 787 dreamliners today. the move came after one of the planes had to make an emergency landing in western japan. the crew repo
in government today. marcia mcnutt has worked with me for many, many occasions, most notably during the oil spill. you're looking at one of the fine leaders that worked with the government to make decisions matter and make the difficult decisions. i'm proud to work with her during the oil spill and i'm proud to introduce her now. marcia? >> thank you. the gulf coast is under threats and in particular, i want to speak of those that impact life and property. it is a deadly combination of loss of natural protection, rising seas from global warming, increasing intensity and number of storms, and more people and critical infrastructure that lies in the coastal zone in the path of those storms. there's no doubt but the coastal zone is a desirable but it is a dangerous place to live and it is getting more dangerous all the time. so what is the solution? well, the good news is that research can help. let me provide you with an analogy. we know that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthq
get government to work and get good things to happen. you can overpower the extremists with intelligence and with reason and with common sense. and you can make this state a safer state. >> the national rifle association responded late today to new york's actions. they put out a statement saying naturally that they are outraged by what new york has done. it should also be noted that the nra is frequently outraged. but other states are looking to join new york. maryland governor martin o'malley, colorado governor john hickenlooper, connecticut governor dan malloy, illinois governor jack markell have all announced in the past few days announced ambitious legislative proposals on gun reform in their own states. and of course federally, tomorrow ahead of schedule, president obama is set to unveil his own set of proposals in response to the newtown school shooting. the white house releasing this picture today of vice president biden, presenting his findings to the president and other cabinet members in a gun policy meeting. >> i can tell you that tomorrow the president and v
. tonko: people have said that there is a need for government, they want effective government, efficient government. well, i think when we look at some of the data that are collected, representative garamendi, it is important for us to acknowledge that as we rebuild in our areas that have been damaged by mother nature, you don't just replace, you need to improve upon the situation. for instance, if there are data that are telling us that more and more water volume is expected in certain watershed areas, as in my district, it would be foolish to spend tax dollars, the hard-earned taxpayer dollars, and simply replace an infrastructure, a bridge, at the same height, at the same span if in fact we know that the water and the force of that water is growing with time. and so these are the ways to, i think, incorporate the soundness of academics and analyses that go into how we respond to this. and if much of it is driven by climate change, global warming, some of the impacts of mother nature that are causing these disruptive scenarios, then ought we not look at sound policy that then stretches
and the government programs and medicare and we are going to have to go back and do this every couple of years but we have to study what works and put more of the policies that are working in place. we have to deal with our other entitlement. it's a contentious issue in this country. it's always a political tough battle. but the longer we wait to make the changes for the people the difference of the programs there is no question about that and we have to go forward with tax reform which is great when you talk about it broadly we all know the tax code is a disaster and none of us like the tax code. when you talk about the ability to broaden the base, lower the rate and raise revenue, that is a pretty good system. it's pretty desirable to think about how to reform the tax code. but there are a lot of tough things when you talk about the specifics and the fact we need to deal with the mortgage deduction for state and local taxation then capping the discretionary you don't have to talk about a single specific policy. taxing the 1% is easy even if you are the 1% its current take more of that to fix the pr
nd, the day after the most liberal, all-government, all the time inauguration speech in memory. "varney & company" is about to begin. you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. orrotect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. >> golfer phil michelson went on a rant about taxes this week and now he wants a mulligan, backtracking from comments suggesting that he quote, may take the drastic step of leaving california. now apologizing for making the personal matter public and to all of the people he upset or insulted. here is part of the ap
the president calls very significant in relief and also the three government chos have done a great job on the storm. >> i'm glad you brought up the fact that this was the old congress. but i want to play for our audience something you said during that initial debate with old congress and then i'll ask you about it. >> this is a total, total disaster in helping those people that we are purposely saying today in uponity if i indicate building we're helping them, isn't that wonderful. what's our jobs? we're not doing anybody any favors. that's why we are september here. try it once in a while. democracy. you may like it. >> pretty good stuff. an impassioned plea and yet still 67% of your compatriots still voted no to that package. do you have a lot of faith this this new portion will pass? >> we've been working through yesterday and last night through the rules committee. we're 90 amendments, many to distract us from what we should be doing. our responsibility is to keep those in deep need, regardless whether happens in florida, whether it happens in the plains in the west, mid jersey, th
from the devastation of hurricane sandy. in the wake of large storms like this, governments knee-jerk reaction is often to throw money at forecasting or storm modeling in order to prevent widespread damage in the future. unfortunately, even with the best imaginable system, forecasting systems, we would not have been able to prevent the structural damages which resulted from this particular storm. yet, here we are debating funding for projects due to go online years from now in an emergency supplemental bill, which is meant to provide aid to those who are still suffering in the wake of sandy. fiscal year 2013, the national weather service received a total of $991 million. that's $20 million over their initial request. noaa is expected to ask for additional funding for this particular project over the next two years, nearly $15 million in fiscal year 2014 and $18 million in fiscal year 2015, the year the first new satellite is due to launch. it is appears that the funding included in the frelinghuysen amendment is simply meant to get the grant portion of this project finished just
they are afraid they will spy on them and report information back to the federal government. host: let's go back to what you said at the beginning when you talk about the politics of this. this headline -- that was in reference to what harry reid had said. some democrats backing down from an assault weapons ban. dianne feinstein but to introduce her assault weapons ban in the 113th congress. chris in washington, independence. -- independent. caller: i'm against any more legislation on guns. it's nonsense. we are back to demonizing inanimate objects. if we want to get rid of things that are deadly, ban the automobile. this is nonsense. brady.ed this with a g it did not work. it did not lower crime. that's not the issue. host: what is the issue and where do you see compromise? caller: i don't see compromise. why should this even be an issue? it is a media-driven emergency. other than that, there is none. host: the new york times front page story -- we will go next to dennis in upper marlboro, maryland, democratic caller. caller: good morning. thank you for the opportunity, first of all. the gentle
to gather dust on the shelf, of some agency, in government, a set of principles emerged, that there was not universal agreement on, but overall whelming consensus on, and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit me about another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president and me. the first foundational principle is, there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment. and it comes with the right of law-abiding, responsible citizens to own guns. use it for their protection as well as for recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not, and legally can be disqualified from, being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners x-ray. -- owners comprise. three, we should make commonsense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant wit
that the government should not be entangled in this. in other words, taxpayer money should not be going for the provision of abortion. that's one bit of good news. the second bit of good news is, i think, again, those of us who have been here a little while, who have been in these trenches trying to beg and plead for an increase of awareness as to what the consequences of abortion are, young people are recognizing that, again, there's got to be a better way. they've lived with this through their generation. they've seen the scars, seen the wounds, seen the effects on society and they're coming forward and saying women deserve better. can't we be loving enough, can't we be big enough to do something different here? and i think that's a great sign of encouragement for two reasons. one is projecting forward, maybe we can reshape society. but also heal the wounds that have already occurred. because they are substantive indeed. and i think it's important, and young people, i believe, recognize this. they're there saying, don't make this choice. it's a false choice. particularly if you feel c
unconstitutional to begin with. that is neither here nor there. the government has gotten so large and so big, they are involving themselves in everything not important to the average citizen. it is my opinion that what we need to do is to stop all of the stuff the government is getting involved in. the way to do that is through a fair, flat tax. host: we are not really talking about that this morning. we are talking about the gun proposals specifically. what kind of gun do you have? caller: i have more than one because i am a hunter. i enjoy hunting. again, back to what we were saying before. that is about all i want to say about it. i think mr. obama and the congress both do not have a clue about what is going on out here in the real world. host: adalfo, what are your thoughts? caller: when i went to high school there was a police presence at all times. the sheriffs are the -- in charge of the campus. in regards to the president's comments, i think there are far reaching and might be unconstitutional. i helped john boehner and mitch mcconnell work hard to prevent him -- i hope john boehner
and information coming from the city governments for two years against drugs and drug cartels. knowing that there is another stage in the initiative, which is going to do the state government and not the government in this new phase of the initiative they think is necessary that the american people, the federal government in mexico and the united states in which we have a lot of hope in the government of mr. pena nieto and the government of mr. obama, that they can listen other voices on a very delicate subject to security. what are we doing, local governments facing challenges that sometimes go out of our hands and anyway we have to deal with them. there is no doubt that the main concern, for instance, in my city in northeast mexico is a border state with taxes. too often, cities have borders with the rio, texas that we also have my city on the southeast part of the state and it's a strategic location. my city the city of 670,000 people. it's a big city. the metropolitan area sharing the space which has two cities, our neighbors in another city, which is my city. there is no doubt tha
of these lawsuits? >> he will pay back some. he will settle. the government settles these sort of cases. let's say he loses 50 million bucks, he still has a fair amount. he's not going to starve. more importantly, he will have his narrative back, his life as a competitive athlete back. the question is, is he going to apologize to the people he hurt along the way? we talk about this as if he's the only part of the story. in fact, he's not. the story is much bigger than just him. >> he has great pr. but, as you and i talked about before, juliette, he was a jerk to an awful lot of people. i mean, he sought to destroy people who would testify against him, who had spoken the truth. >> i think jerk is an understatement. i think a lot of those people are devastated right now. and i don't really know what to think when he's calling some of these people up to apologize. i actually spoke to a few people he has reached out to and they're like dumbfounded. they don't know whether to believe him or not. >> did you see him threaten people, reporters who reported things that he felt were inappropriate? >> well,
like that. they keep it for one reason only -- so they can protect themselves against the government. that's what it's all about. host: "the new york times" editorial today weighing in saying the white house has a rare chance to propose and pushed through an agenda for public safety. the assault weapon ban should be renewed and tightened with a special emphasis on those that hold more than 10 rounds. offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. god of the universe, we give us thanks for giving us another day. the people's house gathers today and celebrates in its gathering the wonder of our constitutional form of government. our nation has once again achieved something so often lacking in our world history, the peaceful transition of democratic government. the major change of party in control did not take place, it is still the american experience that our streets are peaceful and winners and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the member
implementation of obama care next year. which is one of the themes i told you about last week, the government made me do it theme. the staffing companies are in flago right now. and i think they'll stay that way for the rest of the year. i think in part because of the affordable care act. they are ultrasensitive to changes in the labor market. temporary employment is more cyclical than regular labor market. first to be hired when the economy comes back. and coming back is exactly what the economy is doing right now. just today we saw the jobless claims drop to the lowest level in five years. >> house ofre. >> full-time employment up 1.4% in 2012, the total number of temporary employees increased by 6.2%. that rapid growth is expected to continue in 2013. the street is looking for 5% growth in temporary employment this year. however, i think that number could ultimately end up being conservative thanks to the affordable care act. aka obama care. once that goes into affect in 2014, companies that employ more than 50 full-time workers will need to provide employees with expensive health care cov
the government accountable to the people. few of us agree with everything that is done or spoken under protection of our first amendment rights, our freedom of the press. but as a son of vermont printers and publishers, you can bet that i have very serious concerns about the press being shut out. of course i oppose the disclosure of properly classified government information, but i think we have to make sure that legislative efforts to protect or prevent classified leaks don't ink fringe upon our fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of the press. and there i might say to the administration as i have said to past administrations, don't overclassify things. don't put a classification on everything that you do, including those things where you want to cover your mistakes. this is an open and free country. let's keep it that way. so i'll keep pushing to update our privacy laws, to address emerging technology and the internet, including the electronic communications privacy act. we have to re-authorize satellite, tv licenses. we have to make most accessible for those with visual disabilities. w
of the federal government, trying to react to newtown in a sensible way. new york has a tough piece of legislation that are expanding their assault weapons ban. they're expanding the reporting requirements that owners who have assault weapons or assault-type weapons are going to have to register those weapons. there is a mental health component that requires psychiatrists to report people with guns who they believe, to be mentally unstable. so this is kind of a wide and a broad package that was negotiated over a period of several weeks. they pushed it through last night. it is going to get approved today. and it is shocking to hear in all of the reports the opposition in new york is minimized. you had 18 senators who voted against this package. they didn't speak on the floor. they just voted against it. the momentum at least in new york is certainly on the side of reducing gun violence. ten other states, states like massachusetts, maryland, illinois colorado, are look at now similar efforts. how do you restrict these military-style weapons? how do you restrict the high-capacity maga
government. peter johnson him up box these legal -- legal analyst. good to have you with this. that is precisely what the president is talking about doing >> with like this notion of having doctors ask people of whether they have guns in their home. what is the next step? was this part of obamacare to begin with? was as part of the plan by which the government becomes literally big brother peering into the hall saying, okay, tell me about yourself road and also tell me whether their is a beretta in your house. if you tell me that that i may have the obligation to report it to the federal government or face an economic or other disciplinary sanction. that is outrageous, and that is scary. lou: as you heard the attorney generals say, he had expected the president to go farther than he did today with his executive initiatives, whether they be memoranda or executive orders. tell what you? >> he has some understanding of the constitution, but the spirit of the executive orders is in derogation of the second amendment. let me do what i can to keep score and end humiliation and been
governments generally follow the faa's lead. the faa's emergency air-worthiness directive says before any other 787 can fly, the operator on the boeing must prove the batteries are safe. >>> on the runway in western japan, an evacuation after the captain of a 787 got a warning light and thought he smelled something burning. the incident comes just a week after the fire in the belly of another 787 in boston. now investigators are taking a hard look at the 787's electrical system and lithium batteries. >> we've had two incidents involving batteries, involving charging circuits, that are under question that have resulted in one case a fire, one case of smoke. >> reporter: today's problem was located near the lithium batteries in the forward bay, underneath the flight deck. behind the nose. last week's fire was behind the wings in the 787's aft electrical bay. the lithium batteries there that run the auxiliary power unit were severely burned and charred. lithium batteries like those used in computers have been known to overheat and catch fire. after a series of in-flight fires, including the
's representativive government. today is special because it's sunday. tomorrow is the ceremonial swearing in on the mall. >> in this day and age, inaugurations have their own set of challenges. we will go over over the logistics and the schedule and the security. >> the formal swearing in is today. today is january 20, the constitutionally mandated day the president must be sworn in. that takes place in about an hour at the white house. we will get a preview from ed henry. >> good morning. interesting, the crowd's a lot smaller than they were four years ago. but still, as you noted, a lot of pomp and circumstance. it started when the president went to arlington national cemetery, met up with vice-president biden. there was a laying of a wreath at the tomb of the unknowns. the vice-president had been sworn in already this morning, a little bit earlier than the president. that's in part because he was sworn in by justice sotomayor who has a book signing this afternoon in new york city. they wanted to get that done at the vice-president's residence this morning. less than an hour from now, i
and the government as the leaders in all of these matters and that's maybe a mistake in matters of religion. you know, we live in a country where the president is not the head of the national church. it's people like the bishop who are religious leaders. i think it might be for many of the issues we're dealing with in the country more forceful and outspoken religious leadership from religious leaders would be helpful. i think about immigration as a ood example and n control as another. othe other hand, there are some matters, just to finish the thought, where the conflicts that we've had are between the government and private actors, the fight we're having over health control, healthcare. >> when you talk to students at catholic university, and wherever, do they seem to you kind of disillusioned? >> maybe with the possibilities of political solutions for our problems, but young people are much more hopeful than the rest of us so i think there's always a much more optimistic spirit on college campuses than there is out in the world. >> well, i would even say, i take it further and i have two young adu
. sympathy about government employees, all of that stops if there is no deal in place. most market participants, most analysts, economists believe they will come up with something, but it is the deal that is in place that is questionable, whether you're a rating agency, whether you are investor, whether you're somebody will look at the paycheck which most americans this week got a pretty rough, eye-opening look at their check. i guess it was last week, when they saw the big cut in the social security payroll tax. it was a jump. you have less money now. so many things are affected unfortunately. coming into february, here we are again going to be with spending cuts going to kick in officially. all of this will affect unfortunately the markets. it will be a little rough. the economy is fragile. don't get a deal, jenna. you're looking at recession. fitch knows that. investors know that. we're watching it here at fox business. a little rough. jenna: all right. those are the stakes, recession or not. we'll watch this very closely over next couple weeks. cheryl, thank you. >> you bet. jo
now. call the number on your screen now! >> a couple of numbers from the government in the news background today, but they probably will not affect trading one way or the other. point number one, the pro he dueser price index was down .2% in the latest month. year over year, up 1.3%, in other words, no inflation at the producer level. retail sales for december, not bad, not great. up .5. strip out car sales, and you've got a gain of .3%. that's not exactly a gang buster christmas now, is it? nonetheless, those are the numbers and that's what we've got. in my opinion, the next big number that will truly affect trading will be the gdp numbers. and that's when we find out what kind of economy we've got in the fourth quarter of last year. that will point towards how we're going to do in 2013. i suspect that that could move the market. all right. the bell is ringing, and as you know by now, if you're a regular "varney & company" viewer when the bell stops ringing, they start trading and we're expecting, what are we expecting? we're looking for a pretty flat market and i hate to keep
in their view of the ii amendment. the government is going to come and take away their guns. that is a real palpable fear and that is something that can be addressed by the obama administration. if the president could assure gun owners that they are not going to take away their guns. >> people say it all the time. when the president says that, well, we don't believe that. especially since he has been so demon identifieding demonising for so long. but i still think. i have a number of friends, i have seen them post on facebook. the government will never come and take my guns. the administration will go further to reassure them. for some of them, it may slow down how many weapons they could buy but at the same time they would still have access to firearms for hunting and self defense. the divide between most gun owners and the nra leadership and the more active members of the nra is that something that they believe but only say in the selective environment is they want to have enough fire power to fight police and military forces. >> frank smyth thank you for joining me tonight. some more unm
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)